The Yosemite Conservancy blog. An insider's look at what's happening in the park — and how our donors are making a difference.

Field Notes

The Yosemite Conservancy blog.
An insider's look at what's happening in the park — and how our donors are making a difference.

Yosemite Conservancy Field Notes

Gabriel Sovulewski, who spent more than 30 years working in Yosemite in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, poses on horseback on the Four Mile Trail (circa 1930). During his decades in Yosemite, including many years as park supervisor, Sovulewski oversaw construction and improvement projects on trails throughout the park. Photo: Yosemite Historic Photo Collection.

Yosemite Valley's popular trails took shape at different times, and cover a wide range of terrain, but all offer memorable hiking experiences and breathtaking views —and all benefit from donor-supported restoration work.

Storyteller Brian Shoor has honed his tale-telling technique during decades of entertaining guests around Yosemite campfires. Photo courtesy of Brian Shoor.

For years, Brian Shoor spun tales by the glow of summer campfires in the high country. Now, he's sharing his talents at the Yosemite Theater. Meet the storyteller, adventurer, EMT and ski patrol leader bringing history to life on stage in the Valley. 

A hiker follows follows the trail near Red Peak Pass, in southern Yosemite. Photo: Yosemite Conservancy/Josh Helling

Beyond the Valley floor, hundreds of miles of trails branch out into remote canyons, along rivers and over passes. With support from Conservancy donors, park crews complete restoration work to improve hiking experiences and protect habitat along trails throughout the Yosemite Wilderness. 

A black bear grazes in a meadow in Yosemite. Photo: Yosemite Conservancy/Keith Walklet

Rachel Mazur, Yosemite's branch chief of wildlife, visitor use and social science, is an accomplished ecologist, researcher and author.